May the Curators be Ever in your Favour

meme-week-8
sources: 1 2 3 4

The packaging of information as a commodity is a declining paradigm as we move into a world where value is placed on the abundance of information rather than it’s quality. This means that collectively, we would rather receive a 140-word Twitter notification about a piece of breaking news from an unknown source than wait several hours for it to be declared newsworthy, written, edited, refined and published by an accredited journalist.

The constant sharing, writing and curating of online news means that the power of legacy news institutions is diminishing. The new power is with the people; online virtual democracy is having a huge impact on the physical world. Look at the meme presidential campaign of Donald Trump, for example. We are the news, we write the news, we control the news. Rather than a fancy-shmancy editor-in-chief deciding what will make the front page, what trends in online news is determined by the quantity of nodes (audiences) tuning in, aggregating or curating – and isn’t that how it should be?

A fifty-year old woman with a Masters in Journalism could publish news of a street protest, but a five-year-old could film and publish the same event using his Dad’s smartphone – there is little difference these days. The internet, in all of its distributed glory, allows mass-to-mass communication which is trumping the one-to-many legacy media paradigm. We now live in an ecology where participation is its own reward and the users of the internet become its filters. Thus, there is no need for traditional gatekeepers; prosumers have become gatewatchers.

 

 

 

 

10 thoughts on “May the Curators be Ever in your Favour

  1. I totally agree with you when you said “We are the news, we write the news, we control the news”. I think this is definitely how it should be. Everyday people are consuming news media, therefore everyday people should be involved in the content that is produced – you’re right that what trends online is determined by the quantity of audience that views particular content and I think this ties into the reasoning of why gatewatching is rising. Here is an interesting post on the importance of citizen journalism that you might find interesting: http://iletisim.ieu.edu.tr/flows/?p=1266

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  2. Can’t deny the role of the Internet, or particularly, social media, in reinventing and reshaping the news industry. News consumption has rocketed since the explosion of social networks. I like when you say “The new power is with the people”. Everyday, there are millions of pieces of news share on Twitter and Facebook. They are normally short in order to make news consumption easier, therefore, we are able to consume huge amount of information, and on multiple points of view. That’s a great side the Internet brings about. However, it’s when you say “there is no need for traditional gatekeepers” that makes me think. One of the main value of traditional journalism is credibility, which differentiate the two types, and it exists because of strict gatekeeper.(http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/271657) Imagine how chaotic it would be when there’s nothing right and nothing wrong. I think traditional gatekeeper is still essential despite the unstoppable rise of citizen journalism. Overall, great work!

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    1. That’s so true, I feel that perhaps the social media power will override the legacy’s media for a short time, but eventually, as you say, some sort of gatekeeping will re-enter the paradigm to inject credibility back into the content we consume.

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  3. Great post, I really liked the examples you used explaining that virtually anyone’s input can become a “news source”. It’s interesting to think of when this type of news is used within legacy media, such as a news show like ‘the project’ showing live tweets, strange crossovers.
    🙂

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  4. I loved the examples you used here and the explaining is on point! Maybe even touch base back on what citizen journalism is all about and how this can affect not only your examples but the world as a whole. https://www.brandwatch.com/2013/09/what-is-citizen-journalism-and-how-does-it-influence-news/
    Even with that being said maybe try to include how newspapers have even gone to the internet now as a normal dat to day newspaper is now too slow for our society!

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    1. Thanks for your comment, I hadn’t really thought of newspapers online, but now that you have said it, it makes so much sense! I suppose this is an example of the legacy media desperately trying to remain afloat through appealing to two audiences?
      – Claire 🙂

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  5. Nice linkage. It’s captivating to think about the functions and mechanisms of future news delivery. Like you said, instead of editors and institutions being the gatekeepers, the process of what does and what does not make news essentially democratizes. That said, I’m a bit worried about whether that system will lead to important information simply not reaching the public, as people fail to give attention to events that they should.
    This fear, however realistic, is why I think the future of journalism lies in aggregation. Those deemed as journalistic authorities will filter that which is deemed valuable, with analysis and what not added in as a little value added.
    There’s a sweet website/report thingy about this that I’ll whack in down the end, it’s worth checking out

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-bbb9e158-4a1b-43c7-8b3b-9651938d4d6a

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  6. i agree with you when you said “value is placed on the abundance of information rather than it’s quality”. people are becoming more obsessed with obtain information as fast as possible and have smaller attention spans and aren’t willing to read long articles when then can read a quick 140 word tweet that will give them the same information.

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  7. “A fifty-year old woman with a Masters in Journalism could publish news of a street protest, but a five-year-old could film and publish the same event using his Dad’s smartphone” – this right here is by far the best statement I have ever heard on the topic because it is so true. Who needs a Journalism degree anymore when you can just be in the right place and the right (or wrong) time and film it or write about it yourself, no training needed?

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